register as a notary public

I’m Now a Commissioned Notary – What’s Next?

Once you register as a notary public and you’re officially commissioned (also known as registering to become a notary), there are a few things to do to ensure that you’re continuing to reach new clients and grow your business.

Start with this list to lay the perfect foundation for your new venture.

Register as a Notary Public

1. Ask for Reviews

Like any good business, reviews help build credibility and reputation. You might only have one client right now, but their review could help you land more. It can be uncomfortable asking for reviews, but remember, you’re trying to grow your business and word of mouth matters. If you’re hesitant to ask your client face-to-face, send a quick email asking if they’d be open to sharing their experience and then share the direct link to your preferred review site so that they don’t have to do more work than necessary. The more streamlined the process, the more likely you are to receive that review.

2. Create a professional email address

This is a big one and often overlooked. Having a professional email address will set you apart from the rest. When you use addresses like @hotmail or @yahoo when you’re building a brand, it can come across as unprofessional. Before starting correspondence, follow the steps on our blog post, ‘How to Create a Customized Email Address for your Notary Business.’

3. Have a flat surface for stamping

This tip might seem obvious, but poorly stamped docs are a big “no-no” for mobile notaries.  When using your notary stamp, make sure the document is on a firm, flat surface. Stamping documents on top of files, magazines or stacks of paper may result in a smudged image, which could cause the document to be rejected. (Source: National Notary Association) You want to ensure that your stamp is legible.

4. Set up Google My Business

A Google My Business account is an important tool that keeps your clients and potential clients up to date on your business activities. Post your hours of operation, your location, and cross-post your social media content. Your Google reviews will also live here. Cross-posting tells Google that your business is relevant and starts to compile all of your links into one key destination. When people search for notary publics in their area, you’ll have a better chance of showing up in the search results if you complete your Google My Business profile.

5. Get E&O Insurance

A definition from Nationwide.com:

“E&O insurance is a kind of specialized liability protection against losses not covered by traditional liability insurance. It protects you and your business from claims if a client sues for negligent acts, errors or omissions committed during business activities that result in a financial loss.”

Your coverage might be anywhere from $25,000 up to or more than $1,000,000. Liability insurance is important for a notary public to ensure your safety and security if anything goes sideways. Your protection matters, and you want to have any unwanted situations dealt with promptly.

Growing a successful notary public business will take some time. Your persistence will be what sets you apart from other notary publics in your area. After you register as a notary public, keep this list handy so that you can take the right steps to lay that solid foundation.

Once you’ve established an online presence that’s cohesive and streamlined, you’ll start to see your client numbers grow, and you’ll be well on your way to building a fruitful business or side venture that will bring you that new, healthy stream of income that you’ve worked so hard for. If you’re looking for more tools to grow your notary business, check out our Notary Jane membership options.

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